Throw Out Your Reading Glasses and Start Dating!

Can’t read restaurant menus? Maybe you need reading glasses. Yes, it happens to the best of us.
In tales of vanity, reading glasses make you look 100yrs. old, so you hide them but are forever doomed to order the daily special!

It’s another beautiful day in Paradise, Las Vegas. I am an empty nester.
I mean the nest is empty, really. The husband is gone and even the dog died, RIP faithful friend.
I am living alone for the first time in ages, a newly single woman after many years lived as a married one. I am finding that life is sometimes weird in new ways.
Case in point: the whole dating scene. Here in Vegas it’s interesting because the city attracts so many transients. I go to meet ups that I organize through an online travel community, attend local business networking events, peruse dating websites and belt out a tune or two at the local karaoke bar. My social circle includes lots of interesting people from various backgrounds. I try to be as much of my true self around others as possible.

To ‘be’ your ‘self’ you must first ‘know’ your ‘self’, right? Well I think I’ve figured out a few things about my’self’ and one of them is that I HATE to be seen in public in reading glasses! (Too ‘self’ conscious!) And I hate, when on dates, to have to pull them out. But I’m all but blind to read anything without them, so what to do?

Well the most fun thing I’ve done recently was something I really never thought could even make me smile.
About the time I started needing to wear reading glasses, Lookie Lous reading glasses hairband was invented by Kelly Coty of Nashville and I started wearing them. Thank goodness I could toss out my old reading glasses and still see the fine print. All while looking sexy at the same time. Bring on the dinner dates!
Before I discovered Lookies, I used to struggle and squint or get young children to read for me. If I was going out to eat, I’d call the restaurant ahead of time to know the menu so I wouldn’t have to try to read it once I got there. Now, I proudly wear my Lookie Lous readers. They are so unique everybody wants to know where to buy them. What a cool uni-sexy ‘readerband’ alternative to traditional reading glasses.

So even if the weirdness of dating remains at least the challenge of old lady reading glasses is resolved, so it’s off I go.
Now throw away your reading glasses, get some Lookie Lous and go get yourself a date.

Have a beautiful day,
from Paradise, Las Vegas

Sexy reading glasses Finally!!! Sun readers so handy and sleek at the pool or beach!! Almost invisible in her gorgeous hair. Lightwieght and handy on the beach, at the pool or to hold your hair back off your pretty face![/caption]

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Reading in the New Millennium: Forward to the Past?

Reading in the New Millennium: Forward to the Past?

I’m a bibliophile of the first water. I have spent what seems half my life in bookstores all over the world. Some readers praise the creamy texture of a well-bound volume published on good paper. But it is less noted that old books smell—of the places they’ve been, of dust, molds and fungi, of the hand sweat of former owners. Opening one is sort of like lifting the lid on a tantalizing curry still being cooked. But I am making the switch to e-books even so, and they are changing the way I read and even what I read.

For those baby boomers in their 60s, old-style books do have substantial drawbacks. Print books are often big and heavy. I’ve had back problems and find it difficult to sit for hours with a doorstop in my lap. Carrying a tome on an airplane is literally a pain. As you age, your vision declines, and all the bifocals in the world won’t necessarily let you read small type comfortably. And then, the bane of the bibliophile is the bulkiness of the thousands of volumes you accumulate in a lifetime. You run out of room at home, or at least room your spouse will let you dedicate to yet more bookcases. Some collectors may be so obsessive that they carefully catalog their own private libraries at home, but mine is strewn haphazardly across bookshelves purchased over 30 years, and I can’t always find what I’m looking for.

An e-book reader such as an iPad equipped with a Kindle or Google Books app resolves many of these problems. It is relatively light and portable. Text size and brightness can be adjusted. (People who complain about iPads being backlit don’t seem to realize there is a “sepia” background and that brightness can be changed.) A couple of thousand books can be accommodated as active files on Kindle and many more can be archived. Stanza, Google Books and other applications are virtually infinite in their capaciousness. Books can be stored in the cloud when not in use. On your tablet, books can be listed by author, title or how recently they’ve been read.

But beyond solving the back, eye and space problems of the geriatric set, e-books offer interesting functionalities. You can do keyword searches. Most programs allow bookmarking and margin notes. The Kindle app even allows the collectivity of readers to underline favorite passages together. Some readers attach dictionaries, as with the Kindle app for iPads, and even foreign-language dictionaries. Looking up recondite words may become more common if it is as easy as tapping on them, and this sort of dictionary work is an aid in reading books in other languages.

The tablet book readers are only a platform. It is content that is important. But the two may work together to effect some interesting changes. Google Books are a potentially major change in our reading lives, and the Google Books app for smartphones and tablets gives the reader access to a wide range of out-of-copyright works for free.

I know many Americans do not read any books once they’re out of school or college. But some do, and what they read has been shaped not only by changing tastes but by availability. The availability consideration is being revolutionized. Moreover, the younger generation is actually made up of voracious readers on the Internet, but they favor short-form writing that is easily accessible, such as blog entries and Op-Eds. Reprints at Web anthology magazines such as Zite or Flipboard of classic essayists in easily digested excerpts is now increasingly possible, and it might take only a few passages to go viral to provoke more sustained interest in the classics.

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